At Bilue we firmly believe that diversity is core to our success. As the mobile and emerging technology company our aim is to mobilise millions and we know the best way we can help our clients do so is by having a diverse set of people who contribute their unique ideas, skills and perspectives to all our work. As a company, we consider every form of diversity important, including age, gender, ethnicity, sexual identity, sexual orientation, disability, socio-economic background and more.

Not only do we strongly believe this is the case, it’s also backed up by research conducted by professors from highly respected institutions such as the Kellogg School of Management, as well as a report from the The Anita Borg Institute which takes insights from sources such as McKinsey & Company, Catalyst, Columbia University, and the London School of Business. For example, a study noted in the report, conducted at Carnegie Mellon, found that workgroups containing “at least one female outperformed all-male groups in collective intelligence tests”, and “group intelligence is more strongly correlated with diversity than with the IQs of individual members.

Throughout the life of the company, Bilue has always strived to be a great place to work for people of all backgrounds, needs, and situations. We’ve always worked flexibly, with options for altered working hours or working from home depending on the needs of each individual, and we’ve even hosted kids (and dogs!) in the office when people needed that option. Despite this, we haven’t always been able to find the diverse set of applicants we’re hoping for whenever we look to fill new positions.

 

One of the areas we recently identified as an area for improvement is our recruitment strategy. We’ve recently reworded and reworked the language in our job descriptions, job ads and throughout the interview process, to ensure anyone and everyone feels like they would be welcome and could do their best work at Bilue. We found https://www.hiremorewomenintech.com very useful, although it’s just targeted towards increasing gender diversity in organisations, for tips on how to remove bias during the interview process and our job post descriptions to make them applicable to more diverse applicants. Another action we’ve taken in the last 6 months is to take a more proactive approach to finding candidates. Whereas previously it was common for us to post a job ad on LinkedIn, SEEK and other popular job sites and wait for the applications to come in, we now actively look to the community for the best candidates we can possibly find. We use our LinkedIn networks, our social media accounts and our connections in the community to find candidates who fulfil our goals of having the most diverse and skilled team possible. There is definitely still work to do in this space, and we hope to push this further as we reach into the relevant communities to find an even broader set of people with potential to add value to Bilue.

 

At this stage, it’s important to reflect on where we are today to set a benchmark for where we’d like to be in a year from now. Today, across our Melbourne and Sydney offices, we are a team of 30 in total. Looking at Bilue overall, we represent 10 nationalities and the gender balance is 17% women and 83% men. We will revisit this in 6 and 12 months time.  

 

So what’s next for Bilue….

 

We will be focusing our efforts in a couple of key areas. Firstly, the existing culture at Bilue. National Inclusion Week earlier this month was a timely reminder that creating an inclusive environment cannot be forgotten on the quest to diversity, they go hand in hand and need individual strategies. We will be utilitising Culture Amp, an employee feedback platform, to regularly pulse check the business and our progress towards our initiative goals. Culture Amp allows us to be data driven and gives equal weight to every member of the team’s perspective. The first survey through the platform will focus on measuring the level of inclusion, to ensure our culture is at a place where it can support the initiatives being rolled out. The results of this should be finalised by Christmas, after which we will move our focus towards understanding the level of employee engagement, which we believe is tied in with inclusion.

 

Secondly, as we grow our team the focus will be on hiring for culture add not culture fit. Culture is always changing, we want new employees to bring their own personality and character to build on what we already have. Shifting from ‘culture fit’, which has been an industry practice until recently, to looking for ‘culture add’ is essential for our diversity efforts to thrive.